DK3WN SatBlog

…it's all about one thing

SumbandilaSat active over Europe


08:16 UTC strong downlink signals over Europe
sound … listen to the complete pass (10 minutes)
If I listen to the pass I am left wondering wheter it is what we want, what we need.
And again I remember of some golden rules published many times not only by Ib, OZ1MY:

It is obviously about time to repeate a few good points about operating via the FM repeater satellites.

1. Do not transmit if you can not hea
2. When the satellite is busy – limit the number of QSO’s to ONE
3. Do not call over an ongoing QSO
4. A valid QSO just needs the call and the report
5. Give way to weak stations like /p and /m
6. Allow DX-peditions to make as many QSO’s as there are callers


Status


 

Status of active Satellites on Amateur Radio Frequencies

 

Satellite Status NORAD Uplink Downlink Beacon Mode Callsign Reports Info
TSUBAME ACTIVE 40302 . 437.505 437.275 CW JQ1ZHX latest report details
ChubuSat-1 INACTIVE 40300 . 437.485 437.430 CW JJ2YJY latest report details
4M Lunar Mission INACTIVE tbd . . 145.980 JT65B LX0OBH latest report details
UKube-1 ACTIVE 40074 . . 145.840 CW, 1k2 BPSK UKUBE-1 latest report details
FunCube-2 ACTIVE 40074 435.080 – 435.060 145.930 – 145.950 145.915 1k2 BPSK . latest report details
DX-1 ACTIVE 40071 . . 435.225 9k6 FSK . latest report details
AISat ACTIVE 40054 . 437.513 437.250 CW, 4k8 MSK DP0AIS latest report details
VELOX-I ACTIVE 40057 . . 145.980 CW, 9k6 FSK . latest report details
BugSat-1 ACTIVE 40014 . . 437.445 9k6 FSK LU7AA latest report details
DUCHIFAT ACTIVE 40021 . . 145.980 CW, 1k2 BPSK 4X4HSL latest report details
NCBR1 ACTIVE 40024 . . 145.865 1k2 BPSK AX.25, CW . latest report details
PolyITAN ACTIVE 40042 . . 437.675 CW, 9k6 FSK EM0UKP latest report details
POPSAT-HIP1 ACTIVE 40028 . . 437.405 1k2 AFSK, 9k6 FSK CCSDS, CW . latest report details
EO-79 (QB50p1) ACTIVE 40025 . . 145.815 CW, 1k2 BPSK . latest report details
EO-80 (QB50p2) ACTIVE 40032 . . 145.880 CW, 1k2 BPSK . latest report details
UniSat-6 ACTIVE 40012 . . 437.426 9k6 FSK II0US latest report details
TigriSat ACTIVE 40043 . . 435.000 9k6 FSK HNATIG latest report details
AntelSat ACTIVE 40034 . . 437.575 1k2 AFSK CX1SAT latest report details
SPROUT ACTIVE 39770 437.600 437.600 437.525 1k2 AFSK, CW, SSTV JQ1ZJQ latest report details
AO-7 (Phase-2B ACTIVE 07530 145.850-950 29.400-500 29.502 A latest report details
AO-7 (Phase-2B) ACTIVE 07530 432.125-175 145.975-925 145.970 B,C latest report details
UO-11 (UoSAT-2) ACTIVE 14781 . 145.826 FM, 1k2 FSK UOSAT-2 latest report details
RS-22 (Mozhayets) ACTIVE 27939 . . 435.352 CW latest report details
AO-27 (EYESAT-A) INACTIVE 22825 145.850 436.795 436.795 1k2 AFSK,FM latest report details
FO-29 (JAS-2) ACTIVE 24278 145.900-999 435.900-800 435.7964 SSB,CW 8J1JCS latest report details
ISS ACTIVE 25544 437.550 437.550 437.550 APRS RS0ISS latest report details
ISS ACTIVE 25544 145.20/144.49 145.800 Voice NA1SS latest report details
ISS ACTIVE 25544 145.825 145.825 145.825 APRS RS0ISS-4,-11 latest report details
NO-44 (PCsat1) ACTIVE 26931 145.827 145.827 145.827 1k2 AFSK PCSAT-1 latest report details
SO-50 (SaudiSat-1c) ACTIVE 27607 145.850 436.795 . FM_tone 67.0Hz latest report details
CO-55 (CUTE-I) ACTIVE 27844 . 437.470 436.8375 1k2 AFSK JQ1YCY latest report details
CO-57 (XI-IV) ACTIVE 27848 . 437.490 436.8475 1k2 AFSK,CW JQ1YCW latest report details
CO-58 (XI-V) ACTIVE 28895 . 437.345 437.465 1k2 AFSK,CW JQ1YGW latest report details
CUTE1.7+APDII ACTIVE 32785 1267.600 437.475 . 9600bps GMSK JQ1YTC latest report details
CUTE1.7+APDII ACTIVE 32785 . 437.475 437.275 1k2 AFSK,CW JQ1YTC latest report details
AAUSAT-II ACTIVE 32788 . 437.432 437.432 1k2 FFSK/MSK OZ2CUB latest report details
DO-64 (DELFI-C3) ACTIVE 32789 . 145.870 145.8675 1k2 BPSK DLFIC3 latest report details
CO-66 (SEEDS-II) ACTIVE 32791 . 437.485 437.485 1k2 FM,CW,Talker JQ1YGU latest report details
RS-30 (Yubileiniy) ACTIVE 32953 . 435.315/215 435.315 CW RS30 latest report details
PRISM (HITOMI) ACTIVE 33493 . 437.425 437.250 AFSK,GMSK,CW JQ1YCX latest report details
SwissCube-1 ACTIVE 35932 . 437.505 437.505 1k2 BFSK,CW HB9EG/1 latest report details
BeeSat ACTIVE 35933 . 436.000 436.000 9k6/4k8 GMSK DP0BEE latest report details
ITU-pSat1 ACTIVE 35935 . 437.325 437.325 19k2 GFSK,CW latest report details
TIsat-1 ACTIVE 36799 145.980 437.305 145.980 FM,AFSK,PSK,CW HB9DE latest report details
O/OREOS ACTIVE 37224 . 437.305 437.3037 1k2 AFSK KF6JBP latest report details
Jugnu ACTIVE 37839 . 437.505 437.2759 CW latest report details
SRMSAT ACTIVE 37841 145.900 437.500 437.425 CW latest report details
E1P-U2 ACTIVE 37855 . 437.505 437.502 1k2 AFSK,LSB latest report details
M-Cubed ACTIVE 37855 . 437.485 437.485 9k6 GMSK,KISS latest report details
MaSat-1 (MO-72) ACTIVE 38081 . 437.345 437.345 0k625/1k25 GFSK,CW HA5MASAT latest report details
HORYU-2 ACTIVE 38340 . 437.375 437.378/372 1k2 FSK/CW JG6YBW latest report details
PROITERES INACTIVE 38756 . 437.485 437.485 1k2 AFSK,CW JL3YZL latest report details
AENEAS ACTIVE 38760 . 437.600 437.600 1k2 AFSK KE6YFA-1 latest report details
CSSWE ACTIVE 38761 . 437.349 437.349 9k6 GMSK CSSWE latest report details
STRaND-1 ACTIVE 39090 . 437.568 437.568 9k6 GMSK latest report details
BeeSat-2 ACTIVE 39136 . 435.950 435.950 4k8 GMSK DP0BEF latest report details
SOMP ACTIVE 39134 . 437.504 437.504 CW, 1k2 FSK DP0TUD latest report details
CubeBug-1 ACTIVE 39153 . 437.438 437.438 1k2 AFSK CUBEB1 latest report details
AO-73 (FUNCube-1) ACTIVE 39444 435.150 – 435.130 145.950 – 145.970 145.935 1k2 BPSK . latest report details
DELFI-N3XT INACTIVE 39420 435.570 – 435.530 145.880 – 145.920 145.870, 145.930 1k2 BPSK . latest report details
TRITON-1 INACTIVE 39427 . . 145.815 1k2 BPSK . latest report details
VELOX P-II INACTIVE 39438 . . 145.980 CW VELOXP latest report details
FIRST MOVE ACTIVE 39439 . . 145.970 CW, 1k2 BPSK . latest report details
ZACube-1 INACTIVE 39417 . . 437.345 CW, 1k2 AFSK . latest report details
UWE-3 ACTIVE 39446 . . 437.385
436.395
9k6 FSK . latest report details
LO-74 (CubeBug-2) ACTIVE 39440 . . 437.445 1k2 AFSK, 9k6 FSK . latest report details
MO-76 ($50SAT,Eagle-2) ACTIVE 39436 . . 437.505 various . latest report details
Vermont Lunar ACTIVE 39407 . . 437.305 9k6 FSK W1VTC latest report details
KySat-2 INACTIVE 39384 . . 437.405 9k6 FSK KK4AJJ latest report details
HUMSat-D ACTIVE 39433 . . 437.325 FM CW . latest report details
Firebird U1 ACTIVE 39463 . . 437.397 19k2 FSK K7MSU latest report details
Firebird U2 ACTIVE 39464 . . 437.230 19k2 FSK K7MSU latest report details
IPEX (CP8) ACTIVE 90704 . . 437.270 9k6 FSK KJ6KSL latest report details
MCubed-2 INACTIVE 90710 . . 437.485 9k6 FSK NOCALL latest report details
PhoneSat 2.4 ACTIVE 39381 . . 437.425 1k2 AFSK KJ6KRW latest report details
LO-78 (LituanicaSAT-1) ACTIVE 39569 145.850 437.550 . 9k6 FSK . latest report details
ShindaiSat ACTIVE 39572 . 437.485 437.305 1k2 AFSK, CW JR0ZST latest report details

LUSAT-1 alive at night!


We knew that our LUSAT start transmitting again a couple of years ago, but only when illuminated by sun, and was not heard during the night.
On the occasion of testing the application http://amsat.org.ar/sat.htm saw there was a nightly pass, which was tried to listen.
Without much hope tuned 437.125 MHz, surprised to hear the usual strong 900mW continuous carrier +/- Doppler, but this time after 22 minutes of being LUSAT in the dark.
Commenting locally, several other hams also tried and received LUSAT.
It’s almost a miracle that after almost 25 years, LUSAT vintage Ni-Cd batteries can receive and hold charge.
It seems LUSAT is willing to greet hams on his ‘Silver Jubilee’ due next Jan-22 thru continuing talking with us from space after its more than 128,000 orbits. The LO-19, next to Oscar-7 and UO-11 is one of the most long-lived active amateur satellites.
We have included short report and audio on http://amsat.org.ar/?f=z , Amsat-LU logs.

More information on LUSAT (although in Spanish) on http://lusat.org.ar
Reports welcomed at info at amsat.org.ar

73, lu7abf, Pedro
http://amsat.org.ar
https://www.facebook.com/Amsat.LU


AAUSat3 and STRaND downlink


18:00 UTC 78 deg elevation pass and both satellites are strong and active :-)

AAUSat3 CW beacon: oz3cub b7.2 t-3

aausat_strand


FOX-1 has been selected to join the ELaNa program


Project ELaNa, NASA’s “Educational Launch of NanoSat” managed by the Launch Services Program at the Kennedy Space Center, announced on February 10 that the AMSAT Fox-1 cubesat has been selected to join the program.

NASA will work with AMSAT in a collaborative agreement where NASA will cover the integration and launch costs of satellites deemed to have merit in support of their strategic and educational goals.

Watch for full details to be published in the AMSAT Journal.

AMSAT teamed with the ARRL to write and deliver the 159 page educa- tional proposal to NASA. Letters documenting the importance of AMSAT’s satellites in the education programs at the ARRL and also at the Clay Center for Science and Technology at the Dexter and Southfield schools in Brookline, MA, were important parts of our proposal.

AMSAT President Barry Baines, WD4ASW said, “The ELaNA Launch oppor- tunity marks AMSAT’s return to space after the conclusion of the successful ARISSat-1/KEDR flight. We need to get the flight Fox-1, along with an operational flight backup satellite, built, integrat- ed, tested, and delivered. Our ability to provide a spacecraft and get it launched is dependent upon the active support of our donors who wish to see Fox-1 fly.”

AMSAT Vice-President of Engineering, Tony Monteiro, AA2TX noted this will provide a launch opportunity for AMSAT’s next generation of FM repeater satellites with features and operation beyond the experience of AO-51. AMSAT’s Fox-1 Engineering Team is making progress developing the advanced satellite that will provide these features:

+ Fox-1 is designed to operate in sunlight without batteries once the battery system fails. This applies lessons learned from AO-51 and ARISSat-1 operations.
+ In case of IHU failure Fox-1 will continue to operate its FM repeater in a basic, ‘zombie sat’ mode, so that the repeater remains on-the-air.
+ Fox-1 is designed as the immediate replacement for AO-51. Its U/V (Mode B) transponder will make it even easier to work with modest equipment.
+ From the ground user’s perspective, the same FM amateur radio equipment used for AO-51 may be used for Fox-1.
+ Extending the design, Fox-2 will benefit from the development work of Fox-1 by adding more sophisticated power management and Software Defined Transponder (SDX) communications systems.

The Fox-1 Project presents an opportunity to literally put your call- sign on the Fox hardware. AMSAT is looking for major donations to help underwrite the cost of solar cells/panels, one of the more significant expenses of the project.

These solar cells are needed for the flight unit as well as for the a flight spare. As Fox-1 will have solar cells on all six sides of the spacecraft and given the relatively small surface area available on each side (at most 4″ by 4″ per side), AMSAT needs to invest in high efficiency solar cells to gain as much power as possible to operate the spacecraft.

Several opportunities to make your donation to keep amateur radio in space include:

+ Return the form sent with the letter to reply with your donation for the Fox-1 Project.
– All donations over $40 will receive a Fox pin.
– Donations of $120 or more qualify you for AMSAT President’s Club

+ Call Martha at the AMSAT Office +1-888-FB AMSAT (1-888-322-6728)
+ Paypal donation widget on the main page at: http://www.amsat.org
+ Paypal donation widget for Project Fox at: http://www.amsat.org/amsat-new/fox/
+ You can also go to the Paypal site and send your donation to
martha@amsat.org.
+ The AMSAT Store: http://www.amsat-na.com/store/categories.php

Project Fox web site provide a good overview of the technical progress of the new satellite: http://www.amsat.org/amsat-new/fox/

[ANS thanks AMSAT President Barry Baines, WD4ASW, AMSAT Vice-President of Engineering, Tony Monteiro, AA2TX and AMSAT’s Project Fox Engineering team for the above information]


Atlantis deployed Pico-Satellite Solar Cell Experiment


07:49 UTC Space shuttle Atlantis deployed a small, eight-pound, 5” X 5” X 10” solar cell technology demonstration satellite, called PicoSat, from a canister in the shuttle cargo bay.

Pico-Satellite Solar Cell Experiment (PSSC) is a picosatellite designed to test the space environment by providing a testbed to gather data on new solar cell technologies. This capability will allow for gathering spaceflight performance data before the launch of new satellites with the new solar cell technology as the primary power source. Presently, the two U.S. solar cell manufacturers, Spectrolab and Emcore, are starting production of a new generation of High Efficiency Solar Cells on a two to three year cycle.

The Pico-Satellite Solar Cell (PSSC 2) testbed was scheduled to be deployed after Atlantis undocks from the International Space Station during STS-135/ULF7, becoming the last satellite ever deployed by the Space Shuttle Program. The satellite, also known as “PicoSat,” will perform two DoD experiments during its in-orbit lifetime. First, the Miniature Tracking Vehicle (MTV) experiment goal is to demonstrate the capability of a nano-satellite to serve as an orbiting reference for ground tracking systems while demonstrating 3-axis attitude control, solid rocket propulsion for orbit modification, adaptive communications and active solar cell performance monitoring in a nanosatellite platform. An on-board Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver will provide accurate time and position information to facilitate tracking error analyses. The second experiment, Compact Total Electron Content Sensor (CTECS), will demonstrate a CubeSat form factor space weather sensor with the capability to detect ionospheric density. It uses a modified commercial GPS receiver to detect differences in radio signals generated by occulting GPS satellites.

The PicoSat is 5″ x 5″ x 10″ and weighs 3.7 kg. It is integrated onto Atlantis for the STS-135 mission under the management and direction of the DoD Space Test Program’s Houston office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. PicoSat will be ejected shortly before shuttle re-entry into a low (less than 360-km altitude) orbit with an expected orbital lifetime of three to nine months, depending on solar activity. Multiple on-board megapixel cameras will image Atlantis as the satellite departs, thus supplying the last in-orbit photos of NASA’s workhorse human space transportation system for the last few decades.
After the satellite’s orbit lowers for approximately one month, four ammonium perchlorate solid rocket motors will provide 40 Ns of impulse each and could extend orbital lifetime by an additional two months or alternatively, actively deorbit the satellite. The PSSC 2 bus, MTV and CTECS experiments will be controlled by a primary ground station at The Aerospace Corporation in El Segundo, Calif., and secondary stations that comprise the Aerospace Corporation Internet-based Picosatellite Ground Station Network.

The satellite has two radios for redundancy, both operating on 914.7 MHz, and both using an omni-directional patch antenna.


FASTRAC mission update from JSC Amateur Radio Club


FASTRAC-2 (Emma)
FAST-2 is alive, needs a reset, and has not been commanded yet. FAST-1 and FAST-2 remain attached as planned.

FAST-2’s 1200 bps 3-minute beacon (145.825 MHz) reverted to 9600bps at two minute intervals over night last night. This indicates that the TNC reset itself and the on-board microprocessor wasn’t responsive to restore the settings. This is not serious, but we can’t reset things until we can command the satellites.
FAST-2’s 1200bps beacon had not been updating for the last couple of days which told us at the least, the I2C bus had locked up some time back. We knew this would happen periodically before launch, so this behavior is not unexpected.
FAST-2 has been actively rejecting 9600bps crosslink requests from FAST-1 at 10-minute intervals due to the I2C bus lockup. They had previously been heard by several stations around the world crosslinking the first few orbits after launch Friday evening.
FAST-2’s downlink frequency seems to be about 2-3kHz higher than advertized, so we know the coms subsystem is not at room temperature.

FASTRAC-1 (Sara Lily)
FAST-1 is alive, is beaconing, is attempting to crosslink with FAST-2, but the 437.435 MHz downlink is much weaker than predicted. Nobody to my knowledge has been able to decode beacon data from FAST-1 yet.
FAST-1’s UHF beacon (437.345 MHz) is much weaker than FAST-2. We have heard it occasionally but just above the noise floor.
FAST-2’s responses to FAST-1’s connect requests lead us to believe that FAST-1 is most likely functioning normally.

Thomas M. Campbell


XW-1 FM transponder on


21:15 UTC

BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUT AUE ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUT AVE ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUT TBT ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUT AET ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUT T6T ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUT T6T ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUT TBT ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUT TBE ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AAN A4T ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW

PA Output RF Switch Status    : PA2 Works (Beacon only)
Transponder Working Status    : Beacon only
Transponder Temperature       : 20 C
Beacon RF Output Power        : 125 mW
Beacon Power Supply Volts     : 5 V
Receiver Power Supply Curr    : 0 mA
Linear Transponder ACG Volts  : 0 V
Transponder RF Output Power   : 0 mW
Transponder PA Curr           : 0 mA
Linear Transponder Up Conv    : 0 mA
Linear Transponder Volts      : 0 V
FM Dig S/F Transponder Curr   : 0 mA
FM Dig S/F Transponder Volts  : 0 V

19:33 UTC

BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUA AVE ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUA TBT ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUA TNE ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW EAU TTT AUA T6E ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUA T6T ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUA AVE ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUA AUT ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW
BJ1SA XW XW AAA TTT AUA ATT ETT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT XW XW

PA Output RF Switch Status    : PA2 Works (Beacon only)
Transponder Working Status    : Beacon only
Transponder Temperature       : 21 C
Beacon RF Output Power        : 135 mW
Beacon Power Supply Volts     : 5 V
Receiver Power Supply Curr    : 0 mA
Linear Transponder ACG Volts  : 0 V
Transponder RF Output Power   : 0 mW
Transponder PA Curr           : 0 mA
Linear Transponder Up Conv    : 0 mA
Linear Transponder Volts      : 0 V
FM Dig S/F Transponder Curr   : 0 mA
FM Dig S/F Transponder Volts  : 0 V

12:28 UTC 12 deg elevation pass – FM transponder strong signals and BBS active
sound … XW-1 FM and AFSK A very good example for discipline and effective QSO on an FM satellite :-)

BJ1SA XW XW TTT TAT AUE TTT ETT U4D TT4 BET EBT TTT TTT UNU ETT XW XW

PA Output RF Switch Status    : PA1 Works (Transponder and Beacon)
Transponder Working Status    : Beacon and FM Transponder
Transponder Temperature       : 25 C
Beacon RF Output Power        : 0 mW
Beacon Power Supply Volts     : 5 V
Receiver Power Supply Curr    : 248 mA
Linear Transponder ACG Volts  : 0.04 V
Transponder RF Output Power   : 2250 mW
Transponder PA Curr           : 570 mA
Linear Transponder Up Conv    : 0 mA
Linear Transponder Volts      : 0 V
FM Dig S/F Transponder Curr   : 292 mA
FM Dig S/F Transponder Volts  : 5 V

xw1_18122009_fm

Digital Store-and-Forward (BBS)

I could easily connect the BBS – but it’s no good idea to use both systems (FM transponder and BBS) at the same time.
The 1k2 AFSK signals disturbs every FM QSO and vice versa.
More infos here: www.amsat.org/amsat-new/satellites/documents/XW-1_Store-forward_Transponder_Users_Manual.pdf

xw1_bbs_18122009